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No Sales Tax Increase, Live Within Your Means

Pet Projects Cloud Ventura City Council’s Push For A Sales Tax Increase

Spending Problem

“We don’t have a revenue problem, we have a spending problem.” — Ronald Reagan

The Scenario

The Ventura City Council is determined to raise taxes again by putting a measure on the ballot in November to increase sales taxes by 0.5%-1%. Two previous attempts failed. As is customary, they are not completely forthcoming or transparent when they are trying to extract more money from the citizenry. On January 30, 2016, the City Council held a special meeting at the Ventura Police Department whose true purpose was to discuss raising the sales tax. The Council spent $118,000 to hire consultants to sell the voters on a tax increase. What they learned should have disappointed the Council.

These Councilmembers are pushing hard to put a sales tax increase on November’s ballot.

Confusing Messages From City Councilmen About The Sales Tax Increase

At the January 30th meeting, Deputy Mayor Andrews commented that we are currently in an economic downturn, which is exactly the right time when we as a City should be increasing capital spending.  His comment left many in the audience puzzled. If this is indeed an economic downturn, the last thing the average taxpayer wants to do is pay more taxes. More taxes reduce their ability to pay rent or their mortgage. It cuts into their food budget, their travel and vacation capability, their medical care and their own future retirement.

Mayor Nasarenko is campaigning on the premise that Ventura voters will support a locally kept and locally spent tax. He fails to understand, however, that $340 more out of a household budget is still $340, regardless of where and how it is spent. ($340 is City Council’s estimate of how much more each household will pay annually if the sales tax is increased 1%)

Both the Mayor and Deputy Mayor are ignoring nearby failures of sales tax increases, too. Neighboring Oxnard and Port Hueneme increased their sales taxes and they’re still having budget problems. Politicians in those cities failed to realize it is a spending problem, not a revenue problem. Now, Ventura’s politicians are blindly walking down the same path.

Let’s Not Forget Each Councilmember’s Pet Projects

Deputy Mayor Andrews was adamant at the January 30th meeting that Ventura needs more assistance and housing for the “homeless.” Who falls into this category was not defined which leaves it open to interpretation by city officials. It is a fair assumption, though, that one would be able to identify the beneficiaries of his largess by walking down the street. Nothing prevents spending these taxes on any special project such as this once the money goes into the General Fund.

Councilman Morehouse announced last year during a public session that a sales tax increase would just scratch the surface.  Both he and Councilwoman Weir consistently argue that an increase in the sales taxes is just a start, and that Ventura, like other cities, should also be seeking more taxes for:

  • Median maintenance tax
  • Lighting district tax
  • Fire district tax
  • Recreation district tax
  • Library tax

MORE TAXES – THE BIG PICTURE

[PENURY BY THE PENNY]

A sales tax increase is not an isolated event. To understand the full impact of the tax burden on Venturans, one must consider all the other tax increases facing voters.

The Ventura School District tax, approved in 2012, is up for renewal in 2016. Governor Brown’s “temporary” sales tax increase is also up for renewal. And, Ventura County Transportation Commission is considering a sales tax, countywide.

Then consider other recent tax increases:

Medicare tax went from 1.45% to 2.35%

Income Tax rate went from 35% to 39.6%

Payroll tax went from 37.4% to 52.2%

Capital gain tax went from 15% to 28%

Dividend tax went from 15% to 39.6%

Estate taxes went from 0% to 55%

Real Estate transaction tax of 3.5% was added

There’s An Alternative Plan The City Council Refuses To Consider

Our City government has $20 million more in real property taxes and sales taxes. Add to that the 34% water rate increase, imposed without your affirmative vote, to raise millions to fund and replace the water and wastewater infrastructure under our streets, it becomes clear that city government has enough money.

Our current City Council wants more tax money, calling for citizens to “invest” more of “your money.”  Ask yourself first how they have invested “your money” over the last 8 years, and the answer unequivocally — poorly.  How about showing us first how they manage the tax money they have before demanding more.

If you agree that Ventura should live within its existing budget, then write to your City Councilmembers to say so. Tell them not to tax Ventura citizens any more and to spend the money they have more wisely.

Click On A Councilmember’s Photo To Send Them An Email

Erik Nasarenko,
Mayor

Neal Andrews,
Deputy Mayor

Cheryl Heitmann

Jim Monahan

Carl Morehouse

Mike Tracy

Christy Weir

Editors:

R. Alviani,       K. Corse,     T. Cook,     R. Berry,
J. Tingstrom, R. McCord,  S. Doll,      C. Kistner,
W. Frank

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High Priced Consultants Selling Snake Oil

City Council Hires Consultants To “Sell” Voters On A Tax Hike

Spending Problem

“We don’t have a revenue problem, we have a spending problem.” — Ronald Reagan

The Scenario

The Ventura City Council is determined to raise taxes again by putting a measure on the ballot in November to increase sales taxes by 0.5%-1%. Two previous attempts failed. As is customary, they are not completely forthcoming or transparent when they are trying to extract more money from the citizenry. On January 30, 2016, the City Council held a special meeting at the Ventura Police Department whose true purpose was to discuss raising the sales tax. The Council spent $118,000 to hire consultants to sell the voters on a tax increase. What they learned should have disappointed the Council.

This City Council is pushing hard for a sales tax incease.

Council hired consultants to direct them on how to sell the voters on a tax increase

 [Only 36% say Yes]

At the January 30th meeting, one paid consultant provided his interpretation of the results of a general poll on citizen’s views asked of 630 citizens. The opinions were favorable in such areas as police, fire, beaches, water, paving streets, serving veterans, and protecting the environment.

When it came to answering two questions specifically focused on the need for a sales tax increase, however, the results were remarkably different.

Question:  Does the City need additional funds for City Services?

Great need = 22%

Some need = 38%

Little/no need = 30%

Question:   If on an initial ballot you were asked to increase sales taxes by one-percent or one-half percent how would you vote?

One-percent                                                one-half percent

Definitely yes = 36%                         Definitely yes = 33%

Probably yes – 12%                           Probably yes = 22%

No/probable no = 39%                     No/probable no = 31%

Interpreting the results, fewer than one in four citizens sees a great need for additional funds and only 36% would vote definitely yes for a 1% sales tax increase.

If 630 citizens surveyed believe the City is doing a favorable job with the funds they have and only 22% believe there’s a great need for additional funds, one might conclude the citizens are content with the current situation.  But, the City Council—strongly encouraged by the consultants—continued to push the sales tax increase forward.

The inference is that voters are not smart and need to be led around

expensive consultants

Ventura spends $118,000 on consultants to “sell” voters on sales tax increase

The pollster then advised the Council that they needed to do more to “educate” the people on why they should vote for a sales tax increase to receive approval.  Without education it was a close call.  His words were – “on the one-percent measure you might have a shot.” One council member commented that the “citizens just don’t understand.”

Next, the paid political consultant outlined that of the 109,000 Ventura residents only 24,000 vote and, of that number, 61% are over the age of 50. It was his view that an intense program was needed to “educate” voters because “they need to know what the city council is going to use the money for.”

In fact, that’s the crux of the issue. If the additional sales tax revenue goes into the General Fund, nobody will know for sure how the City Council will use the money.

MONEY FOR EVERYONE AND EVERYTHING

[The Ventura Essential Services Tax Measure]

At the conclusion of the presentation, Mayor Nasarenko announced, “I have made a sales tax measure a core goal for my year as the Mayor.  I have been joined by the Deputy Mayor [Neal Andrews].”

The discussion then moved to a staff report that listed “all of the needs.”  The list of needs total $1.368 billion. That is billion with a “B.” Excluding costs for Water and Wastewater totaling $661,120,000, which the citizens will pay through a 34% increase in water bills the City Council approved in 2015, which leaves $707,734,532 in needs for the General Fund.

Here are some examples of what’s on the City of Ventura government’s shopping list. It is obvious the city council wants to overwhelm the voters with the sizable need for more taxes.

Community Enhancement $199,360,000
Technology $7,420,000
Streets $298,999,747
Public Art $557,462
Parks $112,192,823
Facilities $42,087,500
Fire $3,400,000
Police $4,853,000

This wish list illustrates the consultants’ concern about Ventura citizens, “they need to know what the city council is going to use the money for.”   But, here’s the rub.

As a General Fund Tax Measure, it is impossible to promise or earmark the new tax revenue to any specific project. To earmark funds requires a two-thirds majority vote (67%) on the ballot. To vote in a General Fund Tax Measure requires a simple majority (>50%).

Given the low interest in approving a sales tax increase cited in the survey (36%, at best), reaching a two-thirds majority will be a struggle. A simple majority seems more likely, if the sales tax increase is to pass at all.

Once in the General Fund, the City Council can spend the sales tax revenue as they choose.

No oversight committee, appointed by the city, has ever challenged spending after it has been spent

Mayor Nasarenko isn’t telling voters that no guarantee exists for the City to spend the additional tax revenue on any of the City needs once the tax receipts go into the General Fund. This Council may intend to use the funds for the projects outlined above, but Councilmembers change, city priorities change and needs change with time. In 2007-08 the signs of an economic downturn were clear yet the City government forged ahead, spending money on experts and projects as if they were immune from economic reality. Who’s to say the City won’t syphon off money intended for street repair to pay for another WAV building, for instance?

Consultants oversight committee

Consultants suggest a citizen’s oversight committee

So, the mayor is creating a smoke screen in his “let’s increase taxes” pitch by promising a Citizen’s Oversight Committee intended to give voters the false sense that “how funds are spent” will be closely monitored.

To monitor the funds that closely, however, a Citizen’s Oversight Committee would have to approve any project expenditure before the City makes it—effectively neutering the Council. It’s unlikely the City Council would approve that. And, even if they did, why would we need a City Council at all if this committee controlled the purse strings?

The truth is no post audit Citizen’s Oversight Committee will track city spending that closely, let alone have the power to reverse any spending after the fact. Once the Sales Tax Increase passes, the fact is nobody will look at it again and nobody will reverse any expenditure.

If you believe a sales tax increase will be spent unwisely, raise your voice. Write to the City Council to share your opinion. In addition, insist Council Members Heitmann, Morehouse and Weir—all up for re-election in the November 2016—thoroughly explain their position on the sales tax increase.  After all, they have a balanced budget, they increased water rates by 34% and they have revenues up $20 million to pre-2008 levels.

Click On The Councilmember’s Photo Below To Send An Email

Erik Nasarenko,
Mayor

Neal Andrews,
Deputy Mayor

Cheryl Heitmann

Jim Monahan

Carl Morehouse

Mike Tracy

Christy Weir

Editors:

R. Alviani,       K. Corse,     T. Cook,     R. Berry,
J. Tingstrom, R. McCord,  S. Doll,      C. Kistner,
W. Frank

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Budget workshop lacks financial transparency

Don’t Let A Charade Fool You Into Believing Ventura’s Financial Transparency

Fool Me Once, financial transparencyFool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.

THE ILLUSION OF FINANCIAL TRANSPARENCY

Ventura is holding a Budget Workshop on Monday, March 17, 2014. It may be a meaningless exercise, however, unless the City applies integrity and common sense to the process. Otherwise, the process is rife with budget manipulations owing to a lack of financial transparency.

FORCE THE CITY COUNCIL INTO FINANCIAL TRANSPARENCY

If you have questions or concerns about what you read in this month’s newsletter, address them directly to one, or all, of the City Council members. Click on a photo to send an email:

Cheryl Heitmann, Mayor

Erik Nasarenko,
Deputy Mayor

Neal Andrews,

Jim Monahan

Carl Morehouse

Mike Tracy

Christy Weir

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Budget Manipulation Using Fiscal Sleight Of Hand

Fair is foul, and foul is fair: Hover through the fog and filthy air”
—Shakespeare, Macbeth

STATE OF THE CITY TREASURY

[TRANSPARENCY THROUGH FOUL AND FILTHY AIR]

History continues to remind us that to get to the root of any act of wrongdoing, malfeasance or wrongdoing, you need only follow the money to find the culprit(s). Eventually the truth and they are revealed. That again proved true at the City Council meeting on March 11, 2013.

Shell game balanced budget

Balancing the budget through financial sleight of hand

Our acting City Manager, Johnnie Johnson, in collaboration with the Chief Financial Officer, informed the City Council that those in charge of the budget in our City had adjusted [manipulated?] the GENERAL BUDGET to make it appear that we had achieved a balanced budget. In fact just the opposite was true.

The previous City Manager, Rick Cole together with Mayor Bill Fulton continuously publicized the fact that “we were living within our means”, that “we had balanced our budget” and that our “financial affairs were transparent”. On this Monday night the Council learned otherwise.

What the Council learned is that the $12,000,000 in financial reserves, created in 1992, and still in existence as of 2007, was now in fact only worth $4,300,000. The explanation provided is that Internal Service Funds (noted below), which contained money budgeted and set aside to meet real and specific future costs and potential liabilities, had been reduced so as to make it appear as if the budget had been balanced:

  • ($2m) Unassigned.
  • ($2m) Unfunded Workers Compensation liability
  • ($3m) Potential liability claims reserve Information
  • ($700,000) Technology

The explanation offered is that this was a way to make it appear as if our budget was balanced. As stated by Mr. Johnson, “we have not borrowed it from strangers, but we did borrow it from ourselves… (and) if we do not fund this within five years we will be broke”.

Mayor Tracy, at the conclusion of the presentation stated:

“Based on the way I look on the information we received here tonight we have probably been deceiving ourselves and therefore the general public. There is nothing illegal done here, we did not participate in any conspiracy, but I don’t think it (this) was clear to us”.

—Mike Tracy, Mayor and Retired Chief of Police

He then added that that the Council needed to put more oversight controls in place to prevent this from happening in the future. A new budget will be presented to the Council on May 1, 2013.

Editors Comments

Mayor Tracy and Councilman Heitmann were not on the City Council when these budget “adjustments” were made. For those council members and supporters of the former City Manager, this should be a lesson that the public was deceived and there was not total transparency during Mr. Cole’s administration. To have an interim City Manager, in 6 months time, bring to light that the $12.0M reserve was really $4.3M shows how gullible our leadership has been.

THE NEW CITY MANAGER BUSTS THE BUDGET

Mark Watkins’ higher salary and benefits strain Ventrua’s budget

On March 4, 20013, the City Council met to consider the employment contract for the new City Manager, Mark Watkins. On a vote of 4 to 3 the Council approved the employment contract. He will receive the following salary and benefits plus 6 weeks paid leave:

Base Salary $222,000.00
Annual Cost of Living Increases (1/2% of annual CPI)
Annual Performance Bonuses (3%-7%) $15,540.00
Auto Allowance $6,000.00
City Contribution to 401(K) $12,000.00
Employer Pension Pickup (2.5%) $5,500.00
Total Before Benefits $261,090.00

When invitations for applicants were first published the City Council set the salary rate range of $160,000 to $214,000. The previous City Manager received a salary of $174,000.

The Ventura County Taxpayers Association spoke against approval of the contract because the starting salary was simply too high for an entry level Manager, that the salary should be started lower and then increased to provide performance incentives and the contract provided automatic annual Cost of Living Adjustments (COLA) during the 3 year term of the contract. They also warned against the COLA adjustment because of the precedent it would set when other public union contracts came up for renewal.

Mayor Tracy, Councilman Monahan, Councilwomen Weir and Heitmann approved the contract. They stated that Mr. Watkins was a long time resident of Ventura, that he had worked in the City during his career, that he was an Assistant City Manager in Thousand Oaks and that this was what needed to be paid to attract a qualified City Manager who would focus on the basics of operations of city government. Councilwoman Weir commented that any increase in the salary level could also be justified because “that we have already found savings in the City Manager’s budget to make up the difference”.

Our present acting City Manager commented that Mr. Watkins was a good choice, that this pay increase really only involved “pennies” in the total scheme of things, and that if he did not work out he could just be terminated and given a severance package.

Councilmen Andrews voted against the contract. Councilmen Brennan and Morehouse, after extolling the virtues and accomplishments of the former City Manager, Rick Cole, also voted no.

Editors Comments

Mr. Watkins will cost us an additional 26,102,700 pennies per year. He will earn all of that in dealing with our budgetary issues. We hope that the majority of the Council is right in saying that the additional expense can be justified by the savings that this new Manager will bring to our City.

In the meantime we must be diligent and continue to remind our elected representatives that if they we do not watch how they spend our pennies “we” will have no dollars left.

Editors:


R. Alviani K. Corse T. Cook J. Tingstrom R. McCord S. Doll

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Election Reform

City Council and Referendum for Election Reform

Sad commentary on Ventura's City Council election

A Democracy Will Continue To Exist Up Until The Time The Voters Discover That They Can Vote Themselves Generous Gifts From The Public Treasury.
—ALEXANDER TYLER (1887) Scottish history professor

How Ventura is Really Governed

[Look to the right, look to the left, blame your Neighbor!]

In August we provided our readers information about the November City Council elections, listed the candidates and urged our citizens to vote.  This was an important election but your neighbors did not vote.  Why?  What do the statistics tell us?

Interpreting The Election Results

There are 67,807 eligible voters in the city of Ventura, but 18,945 (28%) of the registered voters voted. There were three open seats so each voter would potentially case three votes in this election. The Ventura County Elections division reported that 47, 062 votes were cast.   This would mean the average voter voted for 2.48 candidates.

If we start with  the total vote count for the 3 winning candidates (20,398), then subtract that number from the total number of votes  cast(47,062), a higher percentage (26,664 or 57%) of voters wanted someone other than those who were elected.

If we extrapolate, using the total of 67,807 registered voters times 3 votes per ballot; the potential number of votes that could be cast would total 203,421. If we then compare the total number of votes received by the three winning candidates to that number it means that these new council members were put into office receiving only 10% (20,398) of the potential vote.

One incumbent proclaimed that his reelection was a resounding approval of his and the City Council’s past performance. Perhaps to his 6,793 supporters, but before we consider the election results as a barometer of public opinion, or that this vote represents a mandate, it should be observed that 72% of the registered voters did not care enough to even vote, and of the voters that did vote 57% of them did not support those who were elected.

Incumbents re-elected. Everyone loses when 72% don’t vote in an election.

Another way to look at this is by adding 48,862 of those who did not vote to the 56.66% (10,734) who did not support the winners; it would mean that 59,596 or 88% of the eligible registered voters did not support these candidates.

The first issue this election exemplifies is that too many candidates provide an advantage for the incumbents to be reelected. When 57% of the voters wanted change but did not get it, it would indicate a need to consider a run off election as part of the Ventura election process of the top 5-6 candidates.

The second issue is that the “special interest” groups are likely controlling how we are governed because they are getting the “Vote Out” for the candidates that support their agenda, while 72% of the eligible registered voters in Ventura did nothing.

NOVEMBER ELECTION STATISTICS

Registration & Turnout
67,807 Voters

 

Vote Count Percent
Precinct Turnout 6,254 9.22%
Vote By Mail Turnout 12,691 18.72%
Total 18,945 27.94%

 

SAN BUENAVENTURA City Council
56/56 100.00%

 

Vote Count Percent
BILL KNOX 4,912 10.44%
KENNETH M. COZZENS 5,564 11.82%
DANNY CARRILLO 4,138 8.79%
CHERYL HEITMANN 7,090 15.07%
CARLA J. BONNEY 3,981 8.46%
MELODY JOY BAKER 952 2.02%
ED ALAMILLO 2,360 5.01%
MARTIN A. ARMSTRONG 1,377 2.93%
CHRISTY WEIR 6,515 13.84%
BRIAN LEE RENCHER 3,307 7.03%
CARL E. MOREHOUSE 6,793 14.43%
WRITE-IN 73 0.16%
Total 47,062 100.00%

 

EDITORS COMMENT

To a large extent, we are preaching to the choir when we say that one of the issues is getting the vote out because we believe MOST of our readers do vote. However, statistical analysis shows that too many are still on the sidelines.

It is a sad commentary on our community when the citizens do not vote, do not care to vote, make no effort to participate in their government, nor do anything to monitor the government bureaucracy that governs our everyday lives.

We also believe that there must be a movement to change the election process, allowing a runoff, to allow voters to voice their true feelings and not have their vote diluted among a field of 11-14 candidates.

The apathy of the non-voting public in this community is disheartening. We at VREG are encouraged by the people of other nations who are willing to stake their lives just to earn the freedom to vote.

Editors:

B. Alviani           K. Corse          T. Cook

J. Tingstrom      R. Mccord      S. Doll

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Fleecing taxpayers costs Ventura money

A Little Here. A Little There. Pretty Soon It Adds Up To Real Money.

For and Against the Parcel Tax

Bellwether: “A male sheep which leads the flock, with a bell on its neck. A leader of a thoughtless crowd” —Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary

THE  SOUND OF THE BELL

[SHEARING TIME?]

Three years ago nobody in city government would pay attention to the voices of caution who warned the City Council about the money excessive public employee salaries cost and the unfunded pensions of public employees. Now, thanks to the City of Bell perhaps the citizens of this community will pay attention to their role in government, and the need for serious and drastic reform.

Everything went wrong in Bell.  It was greed in all of its glory, and it illustrated what is wrong with the arcane public pension system in this State, and in every city in this state, including Ventura.    Bell City Manager, Robert Rizzo, resigned after it was revealed he was being paid $800,000 to oversee a town with a population of 40,000.  Now the LA Times reports that the records actually show that he was paid $1,500,000 a year.  Included in that was 28 weeks of vacation and sick time at a cost of $386,000.  Well he is gone but he is not out because he will collect $600,000 yearly from his pension benefits with CALPERS.

fleecing taxpayers costs Ventura money

Ventura taxpayers get fleeced in Bell disaster. We will pay money to Randy Adams for life.

This example however is even closer to home.  Two people in the City of Bell used to work for the City of Ventura.  Angela Spaccia, Assistant City Manger for Bell was paid  $376,000 a year before she quit, and moved over to work for the City of Maywood.   She used to work for the City of Ventura. Then there is Officer Randy Adams who worked in Ventura for 23 years as a police officer.  He then gravitated through various jobs until he became the Chief of Police for the City of Bell.  He too resigned after it was revealed that he was earning $457,000 a year.  He can retire, as will Ms. Spaccia eventually, but whose money pays the pension?

Not the City of Bell.  They escape nearly all the costs of Chief Adams $411,300-a-year pension. Under CALPERS rules, the city is responsible for just 3% of that because he only worked there for one year. Taxpayers in Glendale, Simi Valley and Ventura would have to pick up the tab.

This happened because Bell hired Adams at more than double the money he was making as Chief in the City Glendale. That salary spike doubled his eligible pension amount under CALPERS, the state’s public employee retirement plan.  Add the state’s permissive pension laws and a host of variables that can dramatically affect retirement pay and we find a system that leaves you in a bleary daze

Other cities will be on the hook for Adams’ pensions costs even though their salaries were relatively modest. until he landed in Bell. When he resigned Chief Adams was making $457,000.  He will now get  approximately 90% of that sum.  Glendale will have to pay around 16% of Simi Valley 18%, and Ventura 63%. Ventura alone will have to pay this guy $259,119 per year for life. Remember, none of this has ever been funded.

CITY OF VENTURA’S RESPONSE

Ventura’s mayor, Bill Fulton, has written several articles on the subject.  You can go view the articles here.  He, like everybody else, condemns the excesses by employees and officials in the City of Bell.  His articles are well written and deserve a read, but how transparent is our city government?  Mayor Fulton answered this question in one article:

“…democracy only works, even in small cities, if people pay attention, and oftentimes people aren’t paying attention. But one of the most disturbing aspects of the Bell situation … is how hard it is to figure out what’s happening even if you are paying attention. In spite of the state’s vaunted Brown Act open-meetings law, California governments are still not particularly transparent”. 

HOW MUCH MONEY DOES THE COUNCIL MAKE?

The City Charter limits council members to $600 per month and the mayor to $700 per month, plus members are paid for participating on certain boards and commissions.  Here is the yearly total:

Councilmember Salary Boards Travel
Fulton, Mayor $ 8,800 $2,000 $1,200
Monahan $7,200 $3,800 $1,200
Tracy $7,200 $0 $1,200
Morehouse $7,200 $1,440 $1,200
Weir  $7,200 $0  $1,200
Brennan $7,200 $0 $1,200
Andrews $7,200 $0 $1,200

 

CITY EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION

Employee Salary Medical Pension Contribution Car
Ken Corney, Police Chief $195,153
Quinn Fenwick, Asst. Police Chief $160,012
Kevin Rennie, Fire Chief $187,000
Don McPherson, Asst. Fire Chief $170,014
Ron Calkins, Public Works Director $175,547
Jay Panzica, Chief Financial Officer $171,265
Rick Cole, City Manager $174,158
Mary Walsh, Asst. City Manager $171,265
Ariel Colonne, City Attorney $194,909
Jeff Lambert, Community Dev. Dir. $171,265
Elena Brokaw, Director, Parks & Rec. $167,088
Jenny Romey, Human Resources Dir. $159,037
Total $2,096,713

*In response to a VREG request for the full cost of each of these employees the City Manager, on August 10, 2010, provided the following response:

“Within the next few days, we (will) have calculations on the cost  of employees over and above regular salary (we’ve just posted those earning over $100,000 including gross pay and overtime) to be followed by the Box 5 W2 calculations (which also includes city paid deferred comp and the value of life insurance) to be followed by a total all-in of that plus city paid benefits and CalPERS contributions”—Rick Cole, City Manager

Editor’s note:

For detailed information on past or present Ventura city employees’ salaries, visit transparentCalifornia.com.

As for Ventura’s exposure to the Randy Adams pension claims, purportedly the City has sent a letter of protest and/or legal challenge to CalPERS to try and stop payment.  Good luck with that one!  Even Chief Adams will lawyer-up and argue we are a nation of laws and not men.

Editors’ Comments:

How many more Randy Adams types do we have out there? How much more  do we owe, over the amount funded through CalPERS, to those who are retired or about to retire in the future?  It is time for government to become proactive instead of reactive in the management of our tax money and find out before we end up in the shearing shed. Stop listening to the bellwether !

Editors:

B. Alviani           S. Doll

J. Tingstrom     K. Corse

B. McCord          T. Cook

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